The Kenosha prosecutors should be punished

The verdict is in. Acquitted on all counts. Justice has been served. The two deputy DA’s who prosecuted the case are enemies of the constitution. They should be disbarred and prosecuted for prosecutorial misconduct as was the DA in the Duke case and the persecution of Senator Ted Stevens. pl

 12,911 total views,  1 views today

This entry was posted in Justice. Bookmark the permalink.

40 Responses to The Kenosha prosecutors should be punished

  1. Fred says:

    Yes. I look forward to hearing Joe Biden’s appology.

  2. BillWade says:

    I’d like to see Kyle Rittenhouse make about a billion dollars in defamation law suits!

    • Pat Lang says:

      Yes, from Biden and the communist cable news.

    • AK says:

      These organizations need to be sued into oblivion. And if that doesn’t work, well then…

      If this republic is to survive, the main stream media apparatus needs to be razed to the ground and those involved in it must be made pariahs in society, one way or another. Their continued existence is unnecessary, and their malice is too overt and destructive to be tolerated anymore. The United States can’t withstand this barrage of hostile, propagandistic mendacity for much longer and still remain a cohesive society.

      On a slightly optimistic note, I think a great deal of the apoplexy over the verdict stems from these organizations knowing that an acquittal surely guarantees forthcoming legal action against them. They’re terrified of it, and they should be. They saw protection from litigation in a guilty verdict, but they bet the farm on their ability to dictate and command the narrative to prevail over the facts, and they lost bigly.

      I used to shake my head a bit when Trump would call the media the enemy of the people. No more. It is apt, accurate, and well deserved. I wouldn’t piss on any of these people if they were on fire.

  3. akaPatience says:

    The amount of MSM/leftist lying never ceases to astound. When proven wrong, they just dig in their heels and lie even more. After all of the evidence that came out in the trial, they STILL call the guy a white supremacist, even though the 3 scumbags he shot, and who first threatened HIS life, were white.

    What’s so unfortunate is that political leadership and law enforcement in Kenosha were guilty of dereliction of duty. They failed BIG TIME, and let the mob destroy their city. If they would’ve done their jobs and nipped the violence and destruction in the bud before it got so out of control, the outcome would’ve been totally different. I have to SMH whenever I see video clips of reporters standing in front of burning, violence-ridden backdrops – yet nevertheless reporting that what was going on behind them was peaceful. What a pathetic joke. That politicians and law enforcement too-often surrender to the lying, riot-inciting narratives the media always seem to proffer when cops and black men have altercations shows how useless and ineffectual they can be.

  4. plantman says:

    This is a huge victory for ordinary people
    I’m feeling very grateful for the outcome

    All the media’s lies amounted to nothing
    12 jurors saw through the nonsense and settled on a fair ruling
    Hurrah, for that!

    It’s still the greatest system on earth.
    Trust the people not the government, the media or Fauci!

    I might even crack a beer tonight in Rittenhouse’s honor

    • Bill Roche says:

      A shame the trial had to be considered a big victory. Col. Lang is correct. The prosecution should be disbarred. But by whom? As to the beer, sigh, Dr. put me on the wagon.

    • BillWade says:

      Plantman,

      Have a Kyle instead:

      chaser and 3 shots, neat.

      Ghislaine’s up next, hoping for some fireworks.

  5. TTG says:

    Yes, there should be a lot more more disbarments and prosecutions for prosecutorial misconduct. There is no shortage of such misconduct. Groups like The Innocence Project and The Marshall Project have fought this problem for years. Police misconduct is just as bad and they’re usually in cahoots with the prosecutors.

    • Pat Lang says:

      TTG

      In my experience the FBI and DoJ were always in “cahoots.” One federal prosecutor whom I knew caught his people and the FBI promising witnesses $5000 to falsely testify.

  6. lysias says:

    Leftists, including politicians, are calling for riots tonight. Biden had the nerve to say that he was “angry and concerned” about the verdict.

    If there are riots tonight, we will know who to blame.

  7. Claudius says:

    Any bets on how long before Garland sends a regiment of Chekists to Kenosha to arrest Rittenhouse for illegal consumption of urinal cakes, loitering with intent to commit mopery or damaging mattress tags? Or whatever else the Ivy League Lawfare types at Brookings can invent.
    Don’t think for an instant that the Bolshies will quit and move along. They never give up.
    My late 60’s student days at a now disgraced Southern Ivy university saw me working in the Library with the head of the local SDS chapter. That guy despised middle class Americans for “abandoning the cities”. There was no reasoning with him. No sense of humor either. I quipped that my family didn’t live in a city, having seen in 1698 that cities are horrible; he went ballistic.
    Taught me that his lot never, ever quit. An ardent communist, he’s probably Dean of History somewhere.

  8. lysias says:

    There’s talk now of a federal prosecution of Rittenhouse for civil rights violations. Unfortunately, there’s legal precedent for that not being a double jeopardy violation.

    Well, if they dare go ahead with that, Biden and the Democrats are becoming so unpopular that that legal monstrosity of permitting such a second prosecution may be ended.

  9. Ishmael Zechariah says:

    Colonel Lang, Fellow Pilgrims;
    Congratulations! IMO Rittenhouse would make an excellent police officer. I hope there is at least one PD in the USA which will accept him.
    Over here we were all waiting to see what would happen. Since sanity prevailed and intimidation failed I won the equivalent of $5 and a bottle of booze.
    This is a good day.
    Ishmael Zechariah

  10. Sans Racines says:

    Amen to that!

  11. A.Pols says:

    Agree with all points. I expected this outcome, but knowing the dark forces at work in our country I wasn’t so sure that the prosecution had some sort of “fake punt” in the works. As deliberations dragged on, my read was one or two jurors resisted acquittal while the bulk of the jury was ready to go after a few hours. Then it took the majority the next 3 days to wear down the holdouts. Maybe one of them will let it leak out after they’ve resettled in Wyoming. But then again some small town in Northern Maine would work too.

  12. Eric Newhill says:

    This is a good day. A court upheld our right to defend ourselves against leftist mobs.

    I wish Kyle the best in recovering his life after the terrible events he has experienced, may it be a long and happy one.

  13. Cortes says:

    The brief video of the verdicts being delivered and the young defendant ‘s reaction was very moving. What unbelievable strain Rittenhouse has been under! The dignified support from his attorneys was great to see. The immediate post-verdict remarks by the judge to the twelve jurors and six alternates were properly appreciative of the difficulties they faced and the choices that they may have to make in the wake of the case outcome.

    Whatever shortcomings the trial may have had, its ending was noble and uplifting.

  14. JK/AR says:

    Perhaps not “prosecutorial misconduct” that could be charged – nonetheless those doofusses might be righteously pointed out to be … oh, ‘willfully ignorant’ I suppose.

    There was a moment during State’s closing I found particularly dumb (sadly I cannot find a short video clip) that ought be pointed out during any process [if] against them ensues that I found particularly galling.

    “What you don’t do is you don’t bring a gun to a fistfight,” Binger said.

    https://www.thewrap.com/kyle-rittenhouse-trial-road-house-image/

    ADA Krause [sp?] in his rebuttal to Defense’s closing, ‘How could anybody reasonably feel an imminent threat of great bodily harm from a skateboard’? (Somehow presuming a skateboard is not a ‘blunt object’?)

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2019/crime-in-the-u.s.-2019/tables/expanded-homicide-data-table-8.xls

    Sure. Certainly there were far more egregious examples of misconduct – ‘chain of custody’ where the withheld drone footage which *magically introduced the provocation element after the evidentiary phase was concluded and the jury was being instructed.

    In recent memory the Merriam-Webster online dictionary people achieved some notoriety for obliterating some word [I can’t recall which] from its acceptable lexicon.

    I’d suggest another:

    Jurisprudence. With prejudice.

    * Duty bound I figured I’d best do my due diligence on where I’d accused Merriam Webster of ahem, “removing a tumor from society” perhaps unjustly, thus:

    https://whyevolutionistrue.com/2020/10/15/merriam-webster-dictionary-changes-language-during-amy-coney-barrett-hearings/

    • Pat Lang says:

      JK/AR
      No! No! Prosecutorial misconduct and disbarment!

      • JK/AR says:

        Please Colonel Lang Sir, don’t misconstrue just from my one example that I disagree with there being very serious “*appearances” of deliberate, with malice aforethought, prosecutorial misconduct.

        *Presuming innocence of course – only then disbarment.

        My comment (above) only pointing out the stupi … belay that, ignorance rather than the malevolence. Though there was plenty of the latter entered into the record.

        As Mister Gump might’ve put it, “Stupid is as stupid does.”

        (& insofar as that box of chocolates goes – cold as it is in Kenosha tonight – anybody puts a tooth into any one of ’em risks losing that dadgone ol’ tooth.)

        • Pat Lang says:

          JK/AR

          Innocence? Did you watch the trial?

          • JK/AR says:

            Colonel Lang,

            Well that, in our system “officially” at any rate must be presumed.

            Even so Sir, I’d more’n likely have tar and feathers (and probably a vat of oil on a low simmer) to hand for at the end of the *process.

            However brief that *process be.

            We gots to keep up the appearance of the proprieties at any rate – if only for posterity!

          • Pat Lang says:

            jk/AR
            If you want justice you have to be brave enough to accuse. That starts “the process.”

  15. Fred says:

    I wonder if the City of Norfolk is going to re-hire the police lieutenant they fired for donating to Rittenhouse’s defense fund?
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/virginia-police-officer-fired-after-donating-kyle-rittenhouse-defense-fund-n1264783

  16. Deap says:

    State Bar Associations have jurisdiction over member disbarment. Don’t know what the rules are for Wisconsin. Never an easy process, and certainly needs more than a single case unless egregious violations of law and procedure were committed – after due process findings. He gets his day in court too..

    Zealous advocacy for your client is a primary duty of any lawyer, even then they “know” they are guilty. In this case, the state of Wisconsin is the client – we the people of Wisconsin. And in this case, even if the prosecutor knows the defendant is innocent, but zealously proceeds with the case anyway, which was assigned to him by the county DA.

    Withholding evidence, tampering with evidence, misleading the judge or jury, jury tampering, material breaches of courtroom decorum (pointing a gun at persons within the courtroom???) – those obviously need review.

    Judicial reprimand may be in order, at the discretion of the judge including sanctions and fines – if improper games were played undermining the system of justice held to sufficient proof. The county District Attorney is subject to the voters, if there is sufficient voter sentiment this office is not conducting itself to sufficiently high standards by self or employees of this office.

    More likely, this lawyer might resign, write a book, make the talk show circuit, and salt away his monetized 15 minutes of fame, with or without an active license to practice law. It will be interesting to see how this plays out – but we have to get past the first few days of public reaction before it all settles out.

    We locally had an egregious elected District Attorney who tried Michael Jackson on child molestation charges, badly handled the very media intense and notorious case, lost the case, yet suffered no consequences with the voters or the bar association. He soon retired on full six figure pension for the rest of his life, which in retrospect was rather short since he died only a few years later.

    District attorney offices are also part of the deep state. They take care of each other. Later it was presumed Jackson in fact was guilty as charged by later witness statements recanting their court testimony. But the jury finding is what mattered, not later what ifs.

  17. jim ticehurst says:

    Yes…The Jury Upheld The Constitution..The Right to Bear Arms..The Right to Self Defense..Came to a Proper and Just Verdict..Upheld The Law…Something The Political System Failed to Do…Which Political Misconduct..Is Criminal In My Opinion..My Concerns Now..Are The Effect will Be That The DOPE Party..will Now Use any and All Means..In Hand…Corrupt..Legal,,or Illegal…To Take Most..if Not ALL Firearms..and All Access to Ammunition Away From Lawful Citizens..Since We Are In The Final Stages of the Surrender of the United States. . By Those Who Have Infiltrated and Sleep with The Corpses .of The Executors..In The Halls and Chambers..of the New DC…..or now The “” District of China.”… Politically..I feel Henry Kissinger and Richard Nixon..Started The Surrender..and Now..
    For What ever Reason Joe Has done It..He Surrendered The Office of the POTUS..and The Government…and Progressivly..The Constitution and FREEDOMS..To The Enemys of The United States…The Damage..Is Long..Excessive..and Soon..Will Most Likely be Irreversible…

  18. English Outsider says:

    What a lucky young man. Found himself in a kill or be killed situation and his attackers seem to have been threatening enough – and that provably – to justify self-defence. Then fortunate enough to come in front of a don’t give a damn judge and yet more fortunate to be facing amateur night prosecutors.

    Could have gone so badly wrong at any stage. But if vigilantes are going to take it upon themselves to defend property with guns they ought to get themselves properly organised. Someone in charge who would not allow a boy to wander off into a hostile mob with no backup.

    Very difficult to handle things when the police have lost control and the mob is running loose. During the London riots one man left his apartment and came out into the street to expostulate with the rioters, or to put out a litter bin fire – accounts vary. He got himself killed for his pains. Individual efforts to calm things down are futile in such circumstances.

    The Kurdish shopkeepers were more positive. They stood outside their shops with sticks to stop the rioters wrecking their property. Presumably they’d had time to decide what to do if the rioters came their way. They got it about right and their shops were left untouched. But had the rioters been more formidable, and had there been guns around, it’s doubtful that would have been sufficient.

    So the Kenosha vigilantes weren’t really in the right. They had guns and knew how to use them. But a loose group of men with guns is little more than a mob itself. They should have been organised in proper units with someone who knew what he was about in charge.

    • Pat Lang says:

      EO

      They are organized. They are called the National Guard.

    • Deap says:

      Self-defense has two evidentiary burdens: Subjective perception and objective. perception. (1) Did the victim feel his life was in danger, and (2) would anyone in that same situation feel their life was in danger.

      Obviously Rittenhouse subjectively felt his life was in danger. It was the prosecutors only hope to prove objective observers would not reach the same conclusion.

      PS: Yes, lawyers are hired S.O.B.’s. But we already know this.
      Hence his court room attacks attempting to undermine Rittenhouse choices and actions, in order to diminish the objective threat criteria – you could have used your fists, why were you afraid of a skateboard, wouldn’t your attackers be afraid if you pointed a gun at them, etc.

      The prosecutor took a very imaginative route to undermine the second layer of the self-defense argument – attempting to prove no objective observer would have believed a lethal response was necessary. And to go further, he tried to establish Rittenhouse himself was the provocateur – the prosecutor had no other route to pursue, so he went hog wild on the few tools he had at his disposal.

      I appreciate the jury’s deeper instincts that disavowed these attempts to undermine the privilege of self-defense. Because within this –courtroom context–, the prosecutor did put on a fine show, IF you consider his duty was to undermine the second layer of self-defense. He failed.

      But my God, he certainly stretched the limits of courtroom theatrics trying to mount the best case the state required, in order to justify bringing this case before the state’s judicial system. Now comes the matter of stepping over the line and into blatant prosecutorial misconduct – pending.

    • Fred says:

      EO,

      Vigilantes? You mean the ex-cons who were setting fires, the ex-cons who brought handguns, or the other assailants the prosecutors didn’t charge (like drop-kick man, whose identity they claimed not to know)?

      The police did not “lose control “. They were ordered by the mayor, a Democrat, not to perform their duties. Fear not for the future, antifa is attacking anyone with a camera now to teach everyone a lesson; the “next time ” there will be no evidence to prove that they attacked anyone, there will only be the narrative.

      • English Outsider says:

        Fred – here’s the other narrative.

        https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/08/31/witnesses-kenosha-shooting-see-kyle-rittenhouse-shoot-protest-jacob-blake/5675987002/

        Fuller account –

        https://www.gq.com/story/72-hours-in-kenosha

        I find those two links to contain much special pleading and misrepresentation. But as “Deap” says above all that goes for nothing anyway, given that the jury need only consider 1) did Rittenhouse fear for his life and 2) did the circumstances warrant that fear.

        It’s this difference between the two ways of looking at it that will mean the controversy over these killings will remain unresolved. There is no “correct” answer because the question itself varies with the questioner.

        But for me he correct answer is not to have a boy with Lord knows what in his head go fooling around in a scene of riot. Nor is it to allow the mayhem to continue unchecked. It is to bring in sufficient organised force to stop it.

        That irrespective of the motives of the rioters or our opinion of the value of their cause. You’ll note that in the anti-lockdown protests in Rotterdam that’s what was done.

        • Fred says:

          EO,

          “There is no “correct” answer …”

          The correct answer is “Do not violently resist arrest with a knife in your hand when the police have a warrant for your arrest.” The next, or should I say previous, correct answer is do not sexually assault a woman because that’s going to lead to a warrant for your arrest. James Blake didn’t know either, which is why he got shot while attempting to stab a police officer. Had James known the correct answer he would still be alive and Kenosha would not have burned.

          “But for me he correct answer is not to have a boy with Lord knows what in his head go fooling around….”

          Americans can walk the streets of Kenosha, or any other American city, at any time. They should be able to do so without being accosted by the likes of pedophile Rossenbaum, ex-con Mr. Grosskreutz – who had a handgun in his hand; nor should they be attacked and hit in the head with a skateboard, or kicked by anyone, cute media names not withstanding. We need no approval from FBI led Proud Boys, BLM, Antifa, or anyone else. We all understand that we might be inconvenienced by girl scout cookie peddlers, street preachers, or even politicians soliciting our votes. They all accept ‘no thank you’ as an answer.  Unlike Europe here Americans can cross state lines without being searched, needing papers, or SJW permission slips. Or Covid compliance “passports”.

          “You’ll note that in the anti-lockdown protests in Rotterdam that’s what was done.”

          You sound like you are a conquered people. The EU is trying to suppress Rotterdam? Good luck to the free Dutch.

  19. Artemesia says:

    Kenosha is about 750 miles from Washington, DC, and over 800 miles to Charlottesville, VA.
    In DC, Prosecutor Nancy Pelosi has deployed the full strength of FBI to round up persons who so much as trespassed on the Prosecutor’s sacred ground, and many of them have been held in DC jails for many months.

    In Charlottesville, legal vigilantes sheltered inside quickly-cobbled tax-exempt “Integrity First for America” and abundantly funded by ADL have brought a civil case against a dozen men who participated in a permitted “peaceful protest”. Those legal vigilantes have stated their intent to so intimidate, bankrupt, and pursue “for the rest of their lives” those who exercised First Amendment rights that they will never publicly (or even privately) voice their grievances again.

    The “prosecutors” of those two abuses of the legal system — in DC and in Charlottesville — need to share the dock with the Kenosha prosecutor.

    • Fred says:

      Artemesia,

      “Prosecutor Nancy Pelosi has….”

      She has no control over the FBI. That’s Jo&Kamala and the Obamaites in the administration. She’s got the Capital Hill Police, which must be downsized and reformed if and when the other party ever wins a majority.

  20. blue peacock says:

    Glad that the jury had the courage of their convictions and took their job seriously to evaluate the evidence and decide based on that and not media intimidation.

    Indeed the prosecutors should be taken to the woodshed for prosecutorial misconduct. And equally important the FBI for withholding the drone footage. In fact the entire law enforcement apparatus for not doing their job to protect people & property from the mob. Of course none of that will happen as the woke mob have captured top governmental offices.

  21. sbin says:

    Should be punished!
    Will be promoted.

  22. longarch says:

    Deap wrote:

    District attorney offices are also part of the deep state. They take care of each other.

    This gets to the deepest problem. The US system of law has been glorious in the past and is currently corrupt. It would be reckless to try to throw the whole thing away. It would be very difficult to excise the corruption.

    For several years, I have been trying to delve into the works on Jon Roland. I have sought to understand how US law has diverged so badly from the Founders’ vision, and how the deep state became so powerful. I am still woefully ignorant, despite long hours spent on Roland’s pages such as:

    http://constitution.org/1-Education/cs_power.htm

    In a later thread I hope to revisit Jon Roland’s jurisprudence.

    Artemesia wrote:

    In Charlottesville, legal vigilantes sheltered inside quickly-cobbled tax-exempt “Integrity First for America” and abundantly funded by ADL have brought a civil case against a dozen men who participated in a permitted “peaceful protest”. Those legal vigilantes have stated their intent to so intimidate, bankrupt, and pursue “for the rest of their lives” those who exercised First Amendment rights that they will never publicly (or even privately) voice their grievances again.

    The deep state is not limited to traitors who hold official positions of power. Many deep state malefactors have never worn uniforms or held security clearances, but they have money, connections, and psychopathic levels of malice. Thank you for naming “Integrity First for America” — I had never heard of it, but many Internet sleuths will be interested in researching it.

    Claudius wrote:

    Any bets on how long before Garland sends a regiment of Chekists to Kenosha to arrest Rittenhouse …
    Don’t think for an instant that the Bolshies will quit and move along. They never give up.

    Corrupt people in power yield nothing until they are confronted. Sometimes decadent rulers can only be overthrown by great violence that imperils all of society, but sometimes corrupt power structures crumble due to very small disruptions. Therefore do not give up hope.

    lysias wrote:


    There’s talk now of a federal prosecution of Rittenhouse for civil rights violations.

    This kind of perversion of law is a major source of challenges to Western Civilization. Even if Rittenhouse is not subjected to this, many other good people have been and will continue to be subjected to such corrupt prosecution.

    Fred wrote:

    The police did not “lose control “. They were ordered by the mayor, a Democrat, not to perform their duties.

    Many local police, mayors, and similar local officials serve the deep state.

    JK/AR wrote:


    Perhaps not “prosecutorial misconduct” that could be charged

    Binger could definitely be charged with prosecutorial misconduct along with many other crimes. My only concern is that Binger is probably a small evil fish in a big pond of big evil fish with deep state allies.

    English Outsider wrote:

    The Kurdish shopkeepers were more positive. They stood outside their shops with sticks to stop the rioters wrecking their property. Presumably they’d had time to decide what to do if the rioters came their way.

    Presumably the rioters would have overwhelmed the Kurds and then done unspeakable things. A few Kurds with sticks faced a large mob of felons and pedophiles with various weapons, including pistols.

  23. JK/AR says:

    Colonel Lang,

    Not going to bore you with details but this month has been hectic for me. Limited my “internetting” to maybe 1.5 hours per day as I took in my coffee preparing for what came next – and your site is generally the first place I land on.

    Just moments ago I placed two links on Mr. Johnson’s most recent offering noting at the end I’d be visiting this post to place a site’s post which both (in my opinion) “echoes and adds to” what you’ve herein concluded.

    https://www.captainsjournal.com/2021/11/23/thomas-binger-is-both-a-criminal-and-gun-controller/

    (I’ll admit I ought probably desist from commenting here for the next, it does appear, three weeks at least. JK)

Comments are closed.